Speaker Biographies

PRESENTERS

Paul D. Barclay
Associate Professor, Lafayette College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1999

Barclay's research focuses on Japanese colonialism in Taiwan, with an emphasis on relations between Japanese colonists and Taiwan's indigenous peoples. Barclay has published work in Humanities Research, Journal of Asian Studies, and Japanese Studies, among others, and is currently revising a manuscript for publication, tentatively titled The Imperial Centrifuge: Japan's Colonial Subalterns and the Indigenous Peoples of Taiwan, 1873-1930. The Imperial Centrifuge is a cultural and political economic study of frontier contact, commerce and conflict on imperial Japan's southern extremity. He is also general editor of The Gerald Warner Taiwan Image Collection and recipient of a 2007-08 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship.

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James Hevia
Professor of History and Director, International Studies, University of Chicago

Hevia’s research focuses on empire and imperialism in eastern and central Asia, primarily dealing with the British empire in India and southeast Asia and the Qing empire in China. His current research centers on how European empires in Asia developed and became dependent upon the production of useful knowledge about populations and geography to maintain themselves. His books include English Lessons: The Pedagogy of Imperialism in Nineteenth Century China (Duke; Hong Kong U. Press, 2003) and Cherishing Men from Afar: Qing Guest Ritual and the Macartney Embassy of 1793 (Duke, 1995), which won the 1997 Joseph R. Levenson Book Prize, Association for Asian Studies.

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Eliza Ho
Ph.D. Candidate, The Ohio State University

Ho’s recent research on Chinese wartime photography and her dissertation topic on Sha Fei (1912-1950), the first photojournalist working for the Chinese Communist Party, reflect her special interest in investigating photography’s role in China’s nation-building project and identity formation during the epoch of the 1930s and 1940s. Her publications include entries for the Encyclopedia of Modern China (forthcoming 2009) on the history of documentary photography, propaganda photography, and pictorial magazines since 1880. Her other essays appear in Chinese-language publications such as A Compendium of Photographic Arts in Guangdong, 1843-2006 (Lingnan Art Publishing House 2008) and Life Magazine (Shenghuo yuekan). In 2009, she will contribute to the first large-scale show on Chinese documentary photography at the China Institute in New York.

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Leo Ou-fan Lee
Professor of Chinese Literature, Chinese University of Hong Kong; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University

Lee was professor of Chinese Literature at Harvard University until he retired in August 2004. In addition, he has taught at UCLA, Chicago, Indiana, and Princeton before becoming professor at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research interests include modern Chinese literature and cultural studies, contemporary fiction, and cinema in Pan-Chinese regions. Among his representative publications are Shanghai Modern: The Flowering of Urban Culture in China, Voices from the Iron House: A Study of Lu Xun, and The Romantic Generation of Modern Chinese Writers.

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Christopher Pinney
Professor of Cultural and Visual Anthropology, University College London; Ph.D., London School of Economics

Pinney’s research has a strong geographic focus in central India: his initial ethnographic research was concerned with village-resident factory workers. Subsequently he researched popular photographic practices and the consumption of Hindu chromolithographs in the same area. His publications combine contemporary ethnography with the historical archaeology of particular media (Camera Indica and Photos of the Gods). He is currently interested in cultural spaces that conventional social theory has tended to neglect—“more than local and less than global”—and spaces of cultural flow that elude the west. Pinney just published The Coming of Photography in India, based on his Panizzi Lectures, British Library, delivered in 2007.

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Chris Reed
Associate Professor, The Ohio State University; Chief Editor of Twentieth Century China; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1996

Reed is a specialist in the history of modern China with particular focus on the period from the mid-18th to the mid-20th centuries. His teaching focuses on the Qing, Republican, and People's Republic periods. His research concentrates on China's modern media, print culture, print capitalism, and print communism. His book Gutenberg in Shanghai: Chinese Print Capitalism, 1876-1937 (University of British Columbia Press, 2004) combines the history of technology, business, politics, and culture in the study of modernization in China's largest city. Gutenberg in Shanghai won the 2003-05 ICAS Humanities Book Prize.

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William Schaefer
Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2000

Schaefer's research and teaching interests include modern Chinese literature and culture; histories and theories of photography in China; relations between verbal and visual representations; Chinese and global modernisms; landscape representation and geographies of literature; race, primitivism, and anthropological discourse; and comparative studies of literary, ethnographic, and historical narrative. His most recent publications are "Shanghai Savage" (positions: east asia cultures critique 11:1) and "Shadow Photographs, Ruins, and Shanghai's Projected Past" (PMLA 122:1 [2007]). He is completing a manuscript on photography and modernist literature and art in Shanghai during the 1920s and 1930s. His new research concerns the engagement of contemporary Chinese documentary photographers with rural-urban migration and historical traces, and Chinese photography and image theories during the 19th and early-20th centuries.

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Frances Terpak
Senior Collections Curator (Photography), The Getty Research Institute; Ph.D., Yale

Terpak’s research specialties include popular entertainment and optical devices in the early modern period, and the history of photography, particularly as practiced in the French colonies, the Ottoman Empire, and China. Her work also encompasses international European expositions and photography at and of these events. In 1998, she curated the exhibition "Framing the Asian Shore: Nineteenth-Century Photographs of the Ottoman Empire", and co-curated with Barbara Stafford the 2001 exhibition "Devices of Wonder: From the World in a Box to Images on a Screen", which received numerous awards, including a Katherine Kyes Leab/Daniel J. Leab Award for its catalogue and a Webby Award for its website. Terpak is currently planning several photography exhibitions including shows on the Middle East, colonial Algiers, and 19th-century China, the latter entitled “China in a Frame: Early Photography of the Middle Kingdom,” scheduled for fall 2010.

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Wang Ming-ke
Professor and Director of The Chinese Ethnographic Project, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica, Taipei; Ph.D., Harvard

Wang’s research mainly concerns “borders”, such as border space, people, and memory, to represent multiple dimensions of a society and its power hierarchy in order to shed light on cultural conditions between border subjects. He is the author of On Chinese Borders: Historical Memory and Ethnic Identity (Asian Culture Press), The Qiang between the Han and the Tibetans: a Historical Anthropological Study of Chinese Borders (Linking Books), and the newly published The Nomads Choice: First Encounters between Northern Nomads and Han Imperial China.

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Wang Peng-hui
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, National Taiwan University

Wang’s dissertation addresses the development of photography as a tool for ethnographic research and exchange in China’s southwestern regions during the Republican Period. She draws on film and other newly emergent popular media to explore how ‘Chinese character’ develops through new forms of popular media. She focuses on the career of Rui Yifu, China’s first ethnographer, using little known, unpublished archival data from the Institute of History and Philology.

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Yeh Wen-hsin
Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley; Incoming Director, Institute of Modern Chinese History, Academia Sinica (May 2009)

Yeh is a leading authority on 20th-century Chinese history. She is the author or editor of 11 books and numerous articles examining aspects of Republican history, Chinese modernity, the origins of communism, and related subjects. Her books include the Berkeley Prize-winning Provincial Passages: Culture, Space, and the Origins of Chinese Communism (University of California Press, 1996) and The Alienated Academy: Culture and Politics in Republican China, 1919-1937 (Harvard University, 1990). Her most recent publication, Shanghai Splendor (University of California Press, 2007), is an urban history of Shanghai that considers the nature of Chinese capitalism and middle-class society in a century of contestation between colonial power and nationalistic mobilization.

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Zhang Shaoqian
Ph.D. Candidate, Northwestern University

Zhang Shaoqian is a graduate student at Northwestern University, where she is completing her dissertation, “Visualizing New Republican China: Pictorial Construction of the Chinese Citizen (1912-49)”. Zhang is the recipient of research grants from Northwestern University in 2005 and 2006, and most recently received a Dissertation Year Fellowship from The Graduate School at Northwestern.

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DISCUSSANTS AND CHAIRS

Christopher Bush
Assistant Professor of French, Northwestern University; Ph.D., UCLA

Bush was a fellow in the Princeton Society of Fellows 2003-2006. His research and teaching focus on interdisciplinary approaches to European and Asian modernities. He recently completed Ideographic Modernism: "China," Writing, Media, which explores the imagined figure of the ideograph in relation to other media and argues for a wide-spread interpenetration of modernism's technological and ethnographic imaginaries. Bush’s articles include Pacific Rim Modernisms and his current project concerns the construction and dissemination of Japanese aesthetics.

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Peter Carroll
Associate Professor of History, Northwestern University; Ph.D., Yale

Professor Carroll specializes in the social and cultural history of 19th and 20th century China. His research interests include urban history, Chinese modernism, popular and material culture, gender/sexuality, and nationalism. Carroll is the author of Between Heaven and Modernity: Reconstructing Suzhou, 1895-1937 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), which was awarded the Best Book (Non-North American) 2007 prize by the Urban History Association.

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Dilip Gaonkar
Associate Professor, Department of Communication Studies, Northwestern University

Gaonkar is the director of Northwestern’s Center for Global Culture and Communication, home to projects such as “Cultures of Democracy” and “Difficult Democracies.”  These take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of global culture and communication. He is executive editor and member of the Editorial Committee of the highly influential journal Public Culture, Bulletin of the Project for Transnational Cultural Studies.  His publications include Fear of Small Numbers: An Essay on the Geography of Anger (2006); The Empire of Love: Toward a Theory of Intimacy, Genealogy, and Carnality (2006); Modern Social Imaginaries (2004); Alternative Modernities (Duke, 2001), and Disciplinary and Dissent (Routledge, 1996).

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Robert Hariman
Professor of Communication Studies, Northwestern University

Hariman is a professor in the Northwestern’s program in rhetoric and public culture. His publications include Political Style: The Artistry of Power (Chicago, 1995); three edited volumes, Popular Trials: Rhetoric, Mass Media, and the Law (1990), Post-Realism: The Rhetorical Turn in International Relations (1996, co-edited with Francis A. Beer), and Prudence: Classical Virtue, Postmodern Practice (2003); and book chapters and journal articles in several disciplines. His recent, co-authored book on photography, No Caption Needed: Iconic Photographs, Public Culture, and Liberal Democracy (UChicago Press, 2007), has won numerous awards.

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Christina H. Kiaer
Associate Professor of Art History, Northwestern University

Kiaer teaches and researches art of the 20th century, specializing in Russian and Soviet art, the politics of the avant-garde, and feminist theory and art. Her book Imagine No Possessions: The Socialist Objects of Russian Constructivism (MIT Press) appeared in 2005, as did an interdisciplinary volume of essays on Soviet cultural history that she co-edited with Eric Naiman, Everyday Life in Early Soviet Russia: Taking the Revolution Inside (Indiana University Press). Her current research focuses on the problem of Soviet Socialist Realism within the history of modern art; an article from this project, “Was Socialist Realism Forced Labor? The Case of Aleksandr Deineka,” appeared in the fall of 2005 in the Oxford Art Journal. She served as consultant curator on the 2009 exhibition "Rodchenko and Popova: Defining Constructivism" at the Tate Modern Museum, London, for which she wrote an essay for the catalog entitled “His and Her Constructivism.”

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Kerry Ross
Assistant Professor, DePaul University; Ph.D., Columbia University

Ross's research concentrates on hobby photography and middle-class life in 1920s and 1930s Japan. In 2003, she contributed the article “Poetry of Light: Writings on Japanese Pictorial Photography” to the exhibition catalogue Art Photography in Japan 1920-1940 at the Howard Greenburg Gallery, and participated in Japan sessions at the 2003 and 2004 AAS annual meetings. She was a 1999-2000 Fulbright Fellow and a Postdoctoral Fellow in East Asian Studies at the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, 2005-2007. She is currently finishing a book manuscript, “Between art and industry: hobby photography and middle-class life in early twentieth-century Japan.”

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Victor Shih
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Northwestern University

Shih is interested in political economy in developing countries broadly and how politics affect economic outcomes in China specifically. His forthcoming book concerns the impact of factional politics on Chinese monetary and banking policies. His current research examines how China's authoritarian politics affect taxation policies and fiscal transfers. He also has on-going projects on the performance of Chinese banks, signaling in elite politics, and elite selection in China.

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Amy Stanley
Assistant Professor of Japanese History, Northwestern University; Ph.D., Harvard

Stanley specializes in the history of early modern Japan. She is interested in women’s history, the history of gangsters and the underworld, and social policy in early modern cities and towns. Her fellowships include support from the Ministry of Education, the Japan Foundation, and the Whiting Foundation. She has studied at Kansai University, Osaka and Waseda University, Tokyo. Her book project explores official and popular attitudes toward the sex trade in provincial Japan between 1600 and 1868. Other recent work includes an article on adultery and punishment in Tokugawa Japan and research on education for geisha during the Meiji period.

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Brook Ziporyn
Associate Professor, Departments of Religion and Philosophy, Northwestern University

Ziporyn specializes in Chinese Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism. His research focuses on metaphysical, axiological, and epistemological developments in Chinese thought and religion, and on comparative philosophical issues emerging from the encounter between Indo-European and Sinitic thinking as evidenced in Chinese Buddhism, especially Tiantai, and the implications of this encounter for contemporary thought. His published books in intellectual history, religion, and philosophy are Evil and/or/as the Good: Intersubjectivity and Value Paradox in Tiantai Buddhist Thought (Harvard University Press, 2000); The Penumbra Unbound, the Neo-Taoist Philosophy of Guo Xiang (State University of New York Press, 2003); and Being and Ambiguity: Philosophical Experiments with Tiantai Buddhism (Open Court Press, 2004). He has also published several novels.

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ORGANIZER

Sarah E. Fraser
Associate Professor of Art History, Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Fraser published Performing the Visual: Buddhist Wall Painting Practice in China and Central Asia, 618-960 (Stanford, 2004) and an edited volume Merit, Opulence and the Buddhist Network of Wealth on Buddhist material culture (Shanghai Fine Arts Publishers, 2003). She was the chief editor of wall painting and sculpture for the Mellon International Dunhuang Archive (MIDA). Fraser’s major international projects on Buddhist art include a Luce Foundation-supported project on technology and archaeology with the Dunhuang Research Academy. She is currently writing a book-length study on the beginnings of the archaeology field in China in the 1920s and the search for ‘primitive art’ on the frontier. She has also begun a project on late-19th century China photography.

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